Movie Reviews

Movie Review – “Cinema Paradiso” (1988)

 

 

“Cinema Paradiso” is, first and foremost, a love letter to the power of movies. It is about the allure of watching larger than life characters go on adventures. It is about how cinema brings communities together by making us all feel the same emotions. And it is about how movies teach us as much about life as life itself. This movie views cinema through classic nostalgia googles, viewing these strengths through the eyes of a little boy that can’t stay away from his local theater.

The story is similar to Fellini’s “Amarcord” but with a massive focus on movies and the theater. In that this Italian film is mostly told through flashbacks to one character’s youth and the town he grew up in. We meet most of the people in his town, but don’t really get to know any of them until they get in the movie theater. Each character has a different reaction to their surroundings, including some spitting on those who won’t stop talking, or the guy whose seen the movie multiple times and repeats the lines out loud, yet still ends up openly weeping at the ending of the film.

The story almost feels non-existent here, with most of “Cinema Paradiso” focusing on the lives of these characters and how alive they feel while watching movies. These people feel lifeless and bored without cinema in their lives. If they’re not watching movies, they tend to talk about how life relates back to something Cary Grant or John Wayne once said. To see that type of journey evolve from childhood into adulthood and still have this wide-eyed optimism about it all certainly makes it a worthwhile journey.

 

 

But the real power of “Cinema Paradiso” is how it makes you love watching movies. Even if you’re not an avid fan of classic movies, just watch the reactions these people have to films like “Stagecoach” or Kirk Douglas playing Ulysses and you’ll see that movies are much more than just pretty faces and explosions. The ending scene in particular is one of the most powerful and heartfelt scenes I’ve seen in a long time, worthy of being enshrined in a film museum.

Overall, “Cinema Paradiso” is a slice of life Italian film that has a glorious perspective on movies that you don’t see very often. It is a beautifully nostalgic score by Ennio Morricone and some heartbreaking performances from it’s two main leads. I would highly recommend this to anyone who enjoys reminiscing about older movies, as well as to those who want to gain a deeper appreciation of cinema.

Final Grade: B

 

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