Show Reviews

“Fuller House” (Netflix)

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Warning: SPOILERS IN THIS REVIEW

21 years after Full House ended, Netflix welcomes you back to San Francisco and the Tanner/Fuller family. This time around, roles are switched as D.J. Fuller (Candace Cameron Bure) is now a widowed mother of three sons, while Stephanie (Jodie Sweeten) and Kimmy Gibbler (Andrea Barber) move in to help.

Fuller House is the second ABC TGIF series to be revived, after Girl Meets World debuted in 2014. However, where Girl Meets World moved out of their Philadelphia location to the streets of New York, Fuller House is nothing but nostalgia, even keeping the same Tanner house as the central location.

The pilot specifically relies heavily on nostalgia as the series opens with recurring guest Danny Tanner (Bob Saget) feeding D.J.’s infant son Tommy, with every other former lead star making a grand entrance as well. Cue long intros for Uncle Joey (Dave Coulier), Uncle Jesse (John Stamos), Aunt Becky (Lori Loughlin), and twins Nicky and Alex (Blake and Dylan Tuomy-Wilhoit). Even Steve Hale (Scott Weigner) makes his presence known.

The first few episodes really try to make it known that it has been over two decades since the original series left the airwaves, with constant references to new technology like cell phones, apps like Facebook, and online dating sites. Old catchphrases like “how rude” and “have mercy” are aplenty as well, with the new children trying to create their own that never really stick.

Full House is nothing but a classic, and the new kids definitely have big shoes to fill. There isn’t much to say about D.J.’s kids, 13-year old Jackson Fuller (Michael Campion) or 7-year old Max Fuller (Elias Harger) as they are really just the stereotypical pre-teen and male child, but Kimmy’s daughter Ramona (Soni Nicole Bringas) definitely is the breakout of the bunch – not unlike Kimmy herself in the original.

As the episodes play out the series starts to realize what it is, and doesn’t strive to be anything great. The actual important new information about the characters – like Stephanie not being able to have kids – is squeezed randomly in storylines that they almost feel like afterthoughts. As the series progresses, some episodes are actually decent to watch. There is nothing fresh about the series, however, and that is the saddest part about the revival.

Every one of the ‘original guard’ makes at least another appearance – with them usually retelling old plotlines to Full House episodes or trying out old gags on the new kids. The way they handle Michelle (Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen) in the pilot is one of the funniest parts, being very meta and breaking the fourth wall.

With Gilmore Girls making a comeback to Netflix soon, let’s hope that they can do what Fuller House couldn’t: make the original fans satisfied, but continue the storyline with something fresh and different.

Final Grade: 6.5/10

Have you binge-watched Fuller House yet? Tell us what you think in the comments section below!

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